amazon-wish-list-PACT
https://www.pactsanctuary.org/easy-fund-raising.html

Foxes

Foxes
  Zoom



Fox cub with a fracture

We received a call to come to the rescue of a fox cub who was injured. We anaesthetised him and discovered he had a broken leg and 2 very painful fractured canines with the pulp exposed. Luckily his fracture was relatively aligned so we were able to splint his leg and the canines were easily removed. Despite a slow start to the healing we are now getting great progress. The only minor set back was him chewing the end of his bandage resulting in swollen toes however they should heal completely. We have managed to do all of this with minimal human imprinting on him so he should be able to be safely released back to the wild pain free.

An orphaned litter

We had a beautiful litter of 5 fox cubs in Spring/Summer 2020. 4 of the cubs were approximately 5 weeks old and one of them, from a seperate litter, was approximately 6 weeks. These cubs were brought in by a lady who found them and was hand rearing them but needed our help. They grew in strength and health every day. Once they were big enough, we created an outdoor enclosure to aclimatise them to being outside and also to limit their interaction with us. Foxes can very easily become tame so it's important to limit human interaction. Towards the end of August it was time for them to be released!
It is important to release fox cubs via a soft release process so we made sure we found a suitable and safe location outside Norfolk where there is no hunting. A kind lady allowed us to build a soft release pen on her land which they were then closely monitored and cared for by her whilst maintaining the much needed fear of  humans for 2 weeks prior to release. After they got used to the new area we opened the doors and kept them open, but still provide food and water daily until they stop returning, to help aid a successful life in the wild. We set up camera traps for post release monitoring purposes and soon captured some fantastic moments of them returning for a chick or two.
We will continue to monitor them and the team have high hopes for their new life on the outside.